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Xbox Live Avatar codes

agentmlovestacos:

I’m gonna add a code for a different Xbox Live Avatar item to all of my answered Asks. Or at least I will when I remember to add them.

Like these:

Iron Man Mark 42 male suit - 926RG-7VCYC-2DPWP-2FHWP-VFQ9Z

Iron Man Mark 42 female suit - D6YRF-YJRCQ-24MJ4-WDXJV-H3HCZ

Loki male costume - X9379-3X4XY-D6VW4-WXVVH-YC46Z

Loki female costume - GWT33-3QXJY-92W4V-H6F4H-PT7GZ

Redeem on Xbox Live or xbox.com. First come, first served, etc.

joyfulknightona asked:

Hi again Kelly! I was wondering what advice would you give someone who is wanting to become a member of the Carol Corps?

kellysue:

BAM! You’re in. 

There’s no gate-keeping in the Carol Corps. You’re in when you say you are.  

There’s no test, no secret handshake, no contract.  The dog tags and the selfies and the tshirts are fun, but you don’t need them. You say you want to be are part of this community and you are. 

So… Welcome. 

(The “p” is silent, btw. It’s pronounced like “carol core” — heard a lot of “carol corpse” this weekend. A Carol corpse would be an entirely different thing. And one hell of a bummer.)

kierongillen:

lockrocksandcoke:

131-di:

veggiebaker:

therunscape:

Heart attacks symptoms are different for women. I recently learned this. 

Everyone should know these things.

thanks to mainstream media and being unable to show breasts on TV, way too few people know about female signs of cardiac distress, and impending heart attacks. they only know about the “pain in the left arm” male symptom.

i had all these symptoms once and they sent me right to hospital

it was scary bc i didnt know these were the symptoms for female heart issues

I didn’t know this, and immediately sends me down a “WHY?” hole.

This is no modern romance | FreakyTrigger

tomewing:

piratemoggy:

The Winter Soldier is a huge, exploding-battleships-raining-from-the-sky, global-political-conspiracies, massive cast film that is entirely about intimacy. About trust and closeness. The central trio of Captain America, Black Widow and the Falcon have an extraordinary dynamic that is all about them growing closer, empowering each other, saving each other. For a solo film, it’s about a team- that’s right and good for a Captain America film, he’s a soldier and he needs a unit.

A thing about the relationships in Captain America: The Winter Soldier. 

I can’t read this because SPOILERS but it’s Hazel writing about the MCU and that’s always good.

http://tinyhipsterboy.tumblr.com/post/80712983981/i-asked-about-exclamation-points-because-today-in

toffeemilkshake:

alewing:

kierongillen:

tinyhipsterboy:

I asked about exclamation points because today in class—and this isn’t restricted to solely this class but others I’ve taken—my teacher specifically forbade us from using them, even in dialogue, and claimed there is never a reason to use them, that the words should speak for themselves and you’ll…

I was googling some quotes on exclam marks and found them handily collated in a big ol’ article.

. “Cut out all those exclamation marks,” wrote F Scott Fitzgerald. “An exclamation mark is like laughing at your own jokes.” It isn’t actually. When one German starts a letter to another with “Lieber Franz!” they are merely obeying cultural norms, not laughing at their own jokes. Nor is chess notation, which teems with exclamation marks, especially funny. No matter. Elmore Leonard wrote of exclamation marks: “You are allowed no more than two or three per 100,000 words of prose.” Which means, on average, an exclamation mark every book and a half. In the ninth book of Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series, Eric, one of the characters insists that “Multiple exclamation marks are a sure sign of a diseased mind.” In Maskerade, the 18th in the series, another character remarks: “And all those exclamation marks, you notice? Five? A sure sign of someone who wears his underpants on his head.”

Rest of article here.

The laughing at your own joke is the one I always think of. The article’s dismissal of it is playing it a bit dense to make the wider point. Obviously they know Fitzgerald is talking about a specific format for exclamation marks rather than all uses. Pretending otherwise can prove a point, but also misses the original intent.

Generally speaking, the thing to remember is that much depends on the format, where the writing is appearing, what the writing is for.

With straight long-form novel prose? I’d be careful with them. You can file them with adverb over-use or using dozens of synonyms of “said” as someone who’s a little too anxious to communicate, which leads to the prose feeling a little crass and amateurish. The better you are, the less you need the hammer.

Shorter forms though? Like - say, comic dialogue. Comics. Private Letters? Tweets? All modes that are REALLY IRONIC!!!!! Work great. I think exclams work great by themselves too.

!!!!!

My worry is exclamation marks are increasingly a mark of insincerity. When I get an e-mail that features someone doing a lot of exclams, I tend to think of the false jollity and stretched smile of someone working retail with a customer niceness policy. But that’s me, and I’m horrible.

I also have a long term grudge with exclamation marks going back to working on mags, when editors would lob them into your copy. I had an editor say that the magazine would have sold another 5-10K more if the coverline was MEET THE GAME OF THE YEAR! instead of the MEET THE GAME OF THE YEAR we went with.

Exclamation marks are basically a tool of commerce and fake enthusiasm, and as such, can appear tawdry in many other, more serious contents.

However that’s the OTHER thing with exclamation marks. Due to their history, they are inherently disreputable in English. They speak to a lack of control of the character and you as a writer. Deliberately kicking against that social construct can, of course, be the whole point.

Like everything in writing, decide what effect you’re trying to create and then decide the tool for the job. The assumption that the only tool for the job is the exclamation mark is the killer.

(I wonder if that’s what your teacher is going for? It’s not that you’re never to use them again - but they want you to not do it RIGHT NOW and try other ways of getting to the same place?)

And now I will post all that before I re-read it, as if I wrote about this seriously I’d be here all day.

All good points, and I too could talk about punctuation all day.

For example, the full stop/period vs exclamation mark debate tends to remind me of how Stan Lee et al. went DEEPLY SERIOUS in the 70’s and used full stops for literally everything, presumably in an effort to give the gift of literature. So

The reactor is exploding!

became

The reactor is exploding.

Or often

The reactor… is exploding. And maybe we could all learn a LESSON from that. A BORING lesson. You’ve got too FAR this time, Blastarr. As I’m sure you can TELL. From the URGENCY. In my VOICE.

Obviously things evolved to a natural state of full stops for quiet conversational moments and exclamation marks for action very quickly. But if I had to choose, I’d rather have the childlike thrill of all exclamation marks than the ‘literary’ appeal of all full stops any day! Now if you’ll excuse me, I promised Ben that I’d cure him — if it took the rest of my life! And I meant it, mister! Feel my naked urgency as I LUNGE out of this panel in Kirbyesque foreshortening! Biff! Pow! Even an android can cry!

For extra urgency, of course, I prefer to end things on a double hyphen where possible, even in conversation, where it simulates the natural tendency of human beings to converse by interrupting each other —

But! A double hypen ( ⸗ ), consecutive hyphens ( - - ) or an em dash ( — which confusingly is what Tumblr’s markdown makes of consecutive hyphens))?

I thought - - was a double hyphen! I will use correct terminology in future.

M-dashes are the bane of my life, since they have a completely different energy to consecutive hyphens but consecutive hyphens are often ‘corrected’ to m-dashes. Fortunately at Marvel it seems to be the other way around, so I can let busybody programs like Word turn my double hyphens into m-dashes in the secure knowledge that they’ll be changed back in the lettering stage. Before then I was obsessively re-correcting each and every one.

Yes, I’m that anal about pronunciation in dialogue.

http://tinyhipsterboy.tumblr.com/post/80712983981/i-asked-about-exclamation-points-because-today-in

kierongillen:

tinyhipsterboy:

I asked about exclamation points because today in class—and this isn’t restricted to solely this class but others I’ve taken—my teacher specifically forbade us from using them, even in dialogue, and claimed there is never a reason to use them, that the words should speak for themselves and you’ll…

I was googling some quotes on exclam marks and found them handily collated in a big ol’ article.

. “Cut out all those exclamation marks,” wrote F Scott Fitzgerald. “An exclamation mark is like laughing at your own jokes.” It isn’t actually. When one German starts a letter to another with “Lieber Franz!” they are merely obeying cultural norms, not laughing at their own jokes. Nor is chess notation, which teems with exclamation marks, especially funny. No matter. Elmore Leonard wrote of exclamation marks: “You are allowed no more than two or three per 100,000 words of prose.” Which means, on average, an exclamation mark every book and a half. In the ninth book of Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series, Eric, one of the characters insists that “Multiple exclamation marks are a sure sign of a diseased mind.” In Maskerade, the 18th in the series, another character remarks: “And all those exclamation marks, you notice? Five? A sure sign of someone who wears his underpants on his head.”

Rest of article here.

The laughing at your own joke is the one I always think of. The article’s dismissal of it is playing it a bit dense to make the wider point. Obviously they know Fitzgerald is talking about a specific format for exclamation marks rather than all uses. Pretending otherwise can prove a point, but also misses the original intent.

Generally speaking, the thing to remember is that much depends on the format, where the writing is appearing, what the writing is for.

With straight long-form novel prose? I’d be careful with them. You can file them with adverb over-use or using dozens of synonyms of “said” as someone who’s a little too anxious to communicate, which leads to the prose feeling a little crass and amateurish. The better you are, the less you need the hammer.

Shorter forms though? Like - say, comic dialogue. Comics. Private Letters? Tweets? All modes that are REALLY IRONIC!!!!! Work great. I think exclams work great by themselves too.

!!!!!

My worry is exclamation marks are increasingly a mark of insincerity. When I get an e-mail that features someone doing a lot of exclams, I tend to think of the false jollity and stretched smile of someone working retail with a customer niceness policy. But that’s me, and I’m horrible.

I also have a long term grudge with exclamation marks going back to working on mags, when editors would lob them into your copy. I had an editor say that the magazine would have sold another 5-10K more if the coverline was MEET THE GAME OF THE YEAR! instead of the MEET THE GAME OF THE YEAR we went with.

Exclamation marks are basically a tool of commerce and fake enthusiasm, and as such, can appear tawdry in many other, more serious contents.

However that’s the OTHER thing with exclamation marks. Due to their history, they are inherently disreputable in English. They speak to a lack of control of the character and you as a writer. Deliberately kicking against that social construct can, of course, be the whole point.

Like everything in writing, decide what effect you’re trying to create and then decide the tool for the job. The assumption that the only tool for the job is the exclamation mark is the killer.

(I wonder if that’s what your teacher is going for? It’s not that you’re never to use them again - but they want you to not do it RIGHT NOW and try other ways of getting to the same place?)

And now I will post all that before I re-read it, as if I wrote about this seriously I’d be here all day.

All good points, and I too could talk about punctuation all day.

For example, the full stop/period vs exclamation mark debate tends to remind me of how Stan Lee et al. went DEEPLY SERIOUS in the 70’s and used full stops for literally everything, presumably in an effort to give the gift of literature. So

The reactor is exploding!

became

The reactor is exploding.

Or often

The reactor… is exploding. And maybe we could all learn a LESSON from that. A BORING lesson. You’ve got too FAR this time, Blastarr. As I’m sure you can TELL. From the URGENCY. In my VOICE.

Obviously things evolved to a natural state of full stops for quiet conversational moments and exclamation marks for action very quickly. But if I had to choose, I’d rather have the childlike thrill of all exclamation marks than the ‘literary’ appeal of all full stops any day! Now if you’ll excuse me, I promised Ben that I’d cure him — if it took the rest of my life! And I meant it, mister! Feel my naked urgency as I LUNGE out of this panel in Kirbyesque foreshortening! Biff! Pow! Even an android can cry!

For extra urgency, of course, I prefer to end things on a double hyphen where possible, even in conversation, where it simulates the natural tendency of human beings to converse by interrupting each other —

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